Dry-stone walls tracing dividing lines through the island’s fields. Thick-walled cubes with a millenarian past impressive enough to draw the attention of rationalist architects in the 1930s for their extraordinary functionality and the simple beauty of their lines. Wells and fountains that served as festive meeting points after harvests and communal efforts. Dances that preserve in every movement and sound centuries of cultural permeability. Like the waters that filter up through the substratum of Ibiza and emerge as streams that become rivers. Our river. Or the waters that feed the fertile fields of Ses Feixes, thanks to a sophisticated irrigation system of pure Moorish heritage. Or the seawater that laps the rails of the boat huts where fishermen sheltered their tackle and their llaüt, the island’s traditional vessel…

These snapshots of island life can be deciphered and understood by visiting the municipality’s museums. In the town of Santa Eulària des Riu, in a repurposed farmhouse on Puig de Missa, you will find the Ethnological Museum of Ibiza (Museo Etnográfico de Ibiza), whose permanent collection displays the island’s tools, clothes and rural customs throughout much of its history. Another interesting stop is the Santa Eulària Interpretive Centre Can Planetes, where you can visit one of the old flour mills by the river. Another space dedicated to showcasing traditional Ibicenco farm life is the museum Es Trull de ca n’Andreu, an old farmstead in Sant Carles that still conserves its late 18th century olive press.